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saudi arabia? could an abundance of shale oil in the u.s. actually bring about energy independence by the year 2020? we drill for the truth straight ahead. and how rich is rich? the president wants higher taxes for americans earning more than $250,000 a year. is that fair? or should that number actually be $1 million? and could this be the key to resolving the looming fiscal cliff? that and a lot more is still to come on the "closing bell." >>> if a budget is not agreed upon to avoid the fiscal cliff, the average middle class family will pay $2,000 more in taxes. >> that's right. crunch time is upon us. the markets and economy will be held hostage until lawmakers do reach a deal on the fiscal cliff, presumably between now and the end of the year. >> eamon javers is breaking down the plan. over to you. >> just before the break, you and bill were debating whether or not it's too early to start getting sweaty palms about in fiscal cliff problem in washington. as a guy covering capitol hill for almost 20 years, i can tell you it's never too early to panic about what washington might do
working through the election. i suspect it will continue to. >> all right. jeff, in the energy complex itself, what's the best opportunity right now? is it crude? is it heating oil? is it natural gas? what are you looking at? >> if you're a weather player, you certainly want to buy the heating oil. the way we've seen the last couple of days here, the weather has been very unpredictable. that's sort of like the lottery ticket. i would tend to think you can buy heating oil, you can buy gas, buy crude. all on dips here. you're looking for a pop here. again, hopefully we don't have anything that's tragic but could be that wild, crazy weather scenario that could play in this year. >> try to anticipate the unanticipatable. >> something to that effect. >> thank you. see you later. >> meanwhile, bill, even with this two-day selloff we're seeing, our herb greenberg says there's plenty of stocks that may still look overpriced and are poised for a big drop. herb. >> maria, they don't call these battle ground stocks for nothing. you can take a look at them, especially if you look at their charts,
where energy went higher and stocks went lower. we're setting lows right now. the dow down 126 points at the 12,629 level. the nasdaq and s&p are also moving lower. the nasdaq has moved into correction territory, down about 10% from its highs set earlier this year. the s&p is down sharply as well at this hour. so it was those fed minutes, the continued fears we may go over the fiscal cliff as the negotiations are being carried out so far in a very public arena right now. we are off the worst levels of the day, but will these concerns keep investors out of the market right now? let's talk about that, shall we? >> that's what we want to in today's "closing bell" exchange. neil, let me kick this off with you. good to see you. thanks for joining us. as somebody who's putting capital to work in this market, you see a market that is down 600 points on the dow industrials. just since the election, that's 4% declines since the election on november 6th. what do you want to do here? do you want to put money in the market? >> i think you have to put money in the market but what you said is true.
these expectations that we're going to see natural gas supplies really grow over the next several years. the energy information administration today saying that by 2017 or so, we will be an exporter of natural gas. this on top of what the international energy agency has said about natural gas and the fact we're continuing to grow here with our supplies. back to you. >> all right. thanks so much, sharon. of course, stocks not able to hold on to early gains today. the market is lower right now. look at this. this market is down about 3%, just over 3% since last week's presidential election. many believe it's mainly on worries about looming fiscal cliff. >> here to help us break down the trading day, mark freeman and bob posani. what do you think? do you think we get a resolution in the fiscal cliff that will please the market? everybody believes we're going to get something. will it please the market? >> i think that's a great point. to a certain degree, i'm wondering if we're too fixated on what the details will be as opposed to saying, look, do we get an agreement? when we look at it from the marke
at large. you have health care. you have media. you have energy. retail. they're all being transformed by technology or being tech enabled. we've made investment in a health care company, but the way to think about it is anything that creates efficiency and accuracy with high return on investment for the health care companies by just providing better information and better analytics to help provide health care will take significant cost out of the health care system. once again, you're sitting in the sweet spot of where fiscal policymakers are trying to move towards. >> look, even i know that the cloud and mobility are good gret opportunities right now, but presumably, you guys are 100 miles down the road ahead of us. what are we going to be talking about in five years or ten years in technology growth? >> i think -- one of the big opportunities that we're focused right now on is the disruption of these other industries. having technology and seeing technology sort of transform them. think about, you know, what will financial services look like five years from now? how will we be consu
and the last administration. look at energy. look at private cultivation. look at texas. look at oklahoma. look at north dakota. they're creating jobs. then look at the epa. certainly growth is the only way out. we talk about cutting spending. we're not even cutting the baseline. we're cutting the growth in spending. >> what about jim's point of view that the deficit as a percentage of gdp is declining? >> i don't believe his math. i see trillion-dollar deficits for the last several years. i see us fighting over 2, 3, or 4 trillion over ten years when we still have a trillion every year for the last three. it doesn't add up. i don't know what jim is looking at. >> well, it's not my number. it's numbers from the government itself. >> that's good. >> the big decision you have to make when you apply fiscal austerity is how fast and how aggressive do you apply it while trying to improve the deficit but also maintain and not hamper the recovery or end the recovery. i would ask rick and everyone this, the question you have to ask yourself, who's best equipped to make that decision? is it a bunch of e
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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